Gallery

All le moto a ces droits: Notes on Hervé Youmbi’s Translation of the Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l’Homme (DUDH)

Alexandra C. Moore

  • A lime green plaster one-story building, with a black and white sign with French words.
  • A salmon pink outdoor wall, raised upon two layers of dark bricks, featuring a black and white sign with French words.
  • A squat light yellow building with a brown gate at the left-hand side, and a black and white sign on the right-facing wall with French words.
  • A cream-colored building with a sign in black and white, featuring French words.
  • A discolored powder blue slanted-roof one-story building with a black and white sign with French words; two covered moto-taxis are parked in front of it.
  • A two-story light yellow building with a black and white sign featuring French words is draped with wires from a telephone pole underneath a blue, but cloudy, sky.
  • A white and blue building with a mural of two children walking on a path framed by grass. To the left of the mural is a black and white sign with French words; below the mural, half of a mosaic.
  • A grey, beige, and white tiled building with rectangular black awnings below a cloudy sky. On the wall of the building, a black and white sign with words in French.

Moore’s photo essay considers Hervé Youmbi’s 2017 artwork DUDH in the context of the current political crisis in Cameroon. For DUDH, Youmbi translated five articles from the Déclaration Universelle des Droits de l’Homme into Camfranglais and installed them on signs in the quartiers of New Bell Ngangue and Ndogpassi III in Douala, Cameroon. He printed one set of the five articles on a blue background for New Bell and the same articles on green for installation in Ndogpassi III. Youmbi unveiled the signs in December 2017 as part of the Salon Urbain de Douala (SUD) triennial.

Click this link to access Moore’s full photoessay.

Alexandra C. Moore is a PhD candidate in visual studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She researches contemporary art with a focus on artistic practices that connect African and European histories, and is particularly interested in how discourses of race, gender, belonging, and citizenship are constructed and transmitted through representations of territory and built space. At UC Santa Cruz she has held the positions of Public Humanities Graduate Instructor and Institute of the Arts and Sciences Curatorial Fellow. Alex earned a B.A. from Wesleyan University..

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